urvoice

 

Should social organizations be allowed to intervene when parents use corporal punishment in disciplining their children?
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
  • Votes: (0%)
Total Votes:
First Vote:
Last Vote:
 
Powered by Sexy Polling
 

The Month in Photos

December 9

See more details

Science & Sports

The Cedars Rugby Team

Written byGhyd
on 2017-12-11
The Cedars Rugby Team

The Lebanese National Rugby Team, whose captain is currently Karim Jammal, was initially formed by Lebanese Australians in A...

News

Russia Banned from 2018 Winter Olympics

Written byAntranik
on 11 December 2017
Russia Banned from 2018 Winter Olympics

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) banned the Russian team from the Winter Olympics 2018 on Tuesday after evidence emerged of an "unmatched systematic manipulation" of the anti-doping system. IOC President Thomas Bach said, “This was an unprecedented attack on the integrity of the Olympic Games and sport. The IOC EB (Executive Board), after following due process, has issued proportional sanctions for this systemic manipulation while protecting...

Media Minds - Intermediate Division

 

Art & Culture

Starry Night

Written byThea
on 2017-12-11
Starry Night

Vincent Willem van Gogh (1853-1890) was a post-impressionist painter. His work was known for its beauty, emotion, and color, and it highly influenced the 20th century art. Van Gogh drew about 860 oil paintings including “The Starry Night” which is well-known all over the world. He painte...

Pick of the Month

"Men Don’t Cry. Why?"

Written byPerla
on 2017-12-11
"Men Don’t Cry. Why?"

While the world has been progressing and moving forward, in some cases, the human race has actually taken a few steps backwards. Humans continue to suffer from endless problems, with sexism on top of the list. One o...

Humanely Speaking

Silence Won't Save You

Written byDana
on 2017-12-11
Silence Won't Save You

When asked about why she accepted to have her story turned into a documentary, twenty-nine-year-old Cyntoia Brown s...

Incredible Lebanon

Lebanese Science Star

Written bySabine
on 2017-12-11
Lebanese Science Star

Fouad Maksoud is a Lebanese chemical engineer who graduated from the American University of Beirut. He spent 10 months i...

#Good News

Refugees Feel Welcomed

Written byPaola
on 2017-12-11
Refugees Feel Welcomed

Borussia Dortmund’s Westfalenstadion follows the lead of 24 other German professional clubs and opens its doors to...

Litani Pollution Causing Cancer

Created on 31 May 2017

Love Canal1978

Residents in the West Bekaa have been lately forced to flee their homes because of the heavily polluted Litani River, which is causing extremely dangerous diseases and unexpected high rates of cancer.

Lebanon’s longest river has become so polluted that the people who live nearby, especially in Bar Elias, find they have no other option than to pack up and leave. Others prefer to confine themselves to their homes rather than endure the sewage odor and that of the industrial and household wastes being dumped in the Litani.

Residents of Bar Elias claim that the Litani pollution has increased the cancer toll in the town; they are therefore calling upon the government and the concerned minister to take action immediately.

Experts are warning that high levels of chemical and bacterial contamination are reported in the river. Lab tests show bacterial contamination far above the standards for safe drinking water.

Local residents from the Bekaa Valley town of Hawsh al-Rafqa Monday have recently briefly blocked the main road to their village in protest against the pollution of the Litani River. The locals are also complaining that neighboring towns are dumping sewage into the river, causing a putrid odor and groundwater contamination. They are urging the government to enact measures to stop and prevent pollution after increased cases of cancer of the stomach, intestines and respiratory system were reported in the area.

Prime Minister Saad Hariri headed a ministerial meeting last week to follow up on the issue of the pollution of the Litani River and to discuss ways to repair the main water refining station in the central Bekaa Valley and refine water in the power plant.

Last year, the Lebanese Prime Minister, then serving as President, Tammam Salam, announced a national day for the Litani, saying that “the condition of the river is disastrous… we should save it before the river dies.”

There were several efforts to help save the river which culminated in the approval of a $55 million World Bank loan for projects to reduce pollution in the Litani River. The money would primarily focus on constructing sewage networks and connecting them to wastewater treatment plants to prevent untreated waste from being discharged into the river. At this stage, local residents can only hope and pray that these projects come to fruition.

Comments are now closed for this entry